“During the last year or so I’ve come to know and understand more and more the profound this-worldliness of Christianity….I don’t mean the shallow and banal this-worldliness of the enlightened, the busy, the comfortable, or the lascivious, but a profound this-worldliness, characterized by discipline and the constant knowledge of death and resurrection….it is only by living completely in this world that one learns to have faith. One must completely abandon any attempt to make something of oneself, whether it be a saint, or a converted sinner, or a churchy type….By this-worldliness I mean living unreservedly in life’s duties, problems, successes, and failures, experiences and perplexities. In so doing we throw ourselves completely into the arms of God, taking seriously, not our own sufferings, but those of God in the world — watching with Christ in Gethsemane. That, I think, is faith; that is metanoia; and that is how one becomes a human being and a Christian (cf. Jeremiah 45!). How can success make us arrogant, or failure lead us astray, when we share in God’s sufferings through a life of this kind?”

​Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison, 369f., slightly amended (July 21, 1944, to E. Bethge)