“I have the audacity to believe that peoples everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for their minds, and dignity, equality and freedom for their spirits.”

—MLK (10 December 1964, Oslo, Norway

“Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness.”

—MLK

“If you succumb to the temptation of using violence in the struggle, unborn generations will be the recipients of a long and death salute night of bitterness, and your chief legacy to the future will be an endless rain of meaningless chaos.”

—MLK

“The moral arc of the universe bends toward justice.”

— Martin Luther King, Jr.

“I just want to do God’s will. And he’s allowed me to go to the mountain. And I’ve looked over, and I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight that we as a people will get to the promised land. So I’m happy tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man.”

— Martin Luther King, Jr. In his last speech

Martin Luther King, Junior was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. He excelled in school skipping both ninth and 12th grades. At the age of 15 Martin entered Morehouse College. At the age of 19 he was ordained and graduated with a BA in Sociology. In 1955 at the age of 26 he received his PhD in Systematic Theology. In 1963 at the age of 34 he was named “Man of the Year” by Time Magazine. In 1964 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. On April 4, 1968 at the age of 39, as Dr. King stood on the balcony the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, he was shot and killed by James Earl Ray.

“I submit that an individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and who willingly accepts the penalty of imprisonment in order to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the highest respect for the law.”

– MLK

“Never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal.”

— Martin Luther King

“Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.”

— Martin Luther King

“There was a time when the church was very powerful–in the time when the early Christians rejoiced at being deemed worthy to suffer for what they believed. In those days the church was not merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; it was a thermostat that transformed the mores of society.

“Things are different now. So often the contemporary church is a weak, ineffectual voice with an uncertain sound. So often it is an archdefender of the status quo. Far from being disturbed by the presence of the church, the power structure of the average community is consoled by the church’s silent–and often even vocal–sanction of things as they are…

“But the judgment of God is upon the church as never before. If today’s church does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authenticity, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century. Every day I meet young people whose disappointment with the church has turned into outright disgust…”

—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Letter from a Birmingham Jail

“In the end we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”

— Martin Luther King

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.”

— Martin Luther King